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CUBAN ENDEMIC LIVEBEARING TOOTHCARPS

Gambusia Girardinus Quintana

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#1 ovgjr

ovgjr

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Posted 27 April 2018 - 03:55 PM

Dear ALA members:

I’ve been in the hobby for over 50 years. My interests are quite eclectic ranging from livebearers and killies to marine fish and anything in between. I’m retired and am a member of several fish clubs.

I’d like to discuss Cuban livebearers if I may. I was born in Cuba and these little fish are dear to my heart. I have fond memories of collecting gambusinos with my father before the Castro regime decimated most of my family. I am lucky in that my father had the forth sight to bring my immediate family to America in 1961. Well enough about my past.

To my knowledge there is one species of Gambusia, about seven Girardinus species and the monotypic Quintana atrizona endemic to Cuba.

Girardinus are Cuban endemics.
Quintana atrizona is a Cuban endemic.
Gambusia punctata is a Cuban endemic.
Gambusia puncticulata is found in Cuba but also occurs in other Caribbean islands and probably southern Florida as well.

At some point in my long involvement with the aquaculture hobby I’ve maintained most of the above mentioned species and currently am attempting to establish populations of G. falcatus, G. uninotatus and G. metallicus.

I would welcome all information from members regarding Cuban livebearers and would highly appreciate the opportunity to purchase broodstock. Quintana atrizona is at the top of my list as I have not seen a living specimen in over 25 years. It is possibly extirpated from the Cuban mainland but I have hope that it still exists on Isla de Pinos, (Isla de la Juventud as it was renamed by the Castros).

My warmest regards to all.
Orlando Gonzalez
570-800-3333

#2 ovgjr

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Posted 27 April 2018 - 04:24 PM

Additional note:

I’ve intentionally left out the four know Lucifuga species endemic to Cuba. Although a livebearer, I seriously doubt the ALA would consider these cryptic subterraneous cave dwellers as species to be maintained and mostly viewed as curious oddities not being practical fish to keep much less collect. I sort of feel the same way about half beaks.

Orlando Gonzalez




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