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#1 D9VIN

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Posted 19 August 2011 - 10:19 PM

So I am thinking about setting up a multitank breeding setup, primarily for xiphophorus and I have a couple queries.
Number a) how much air power to gallons do I need to effectively run sponge filters? Does it vary based on the filter itself? I was planning on using the cheapo's from eBay, I run several in my tanks now and have been pretty pleased, but I might just diy some if I can find some decent priced sponge.
Point 2) I want to do a centralized sump filter, and I have read three times tank size per hour is a good flow rate. Would this hold true for multitanks? I am thinking maybe 16-20 tanks, most likely consisting of sterilites. Is it a good idea to run centralized filter and sponges, or overkill, or maybe self defeating somehow?

As you can tell, I am in the pre-preliminary planning stages, haha. Got a little one who is just about ready to meet the world, so I am kinda feeling out the cost right now.

#2 Devon1953

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Posted 20 August 2011 - 03:00 AM

never been a fan of a centralized filter. Too easy to wipe out everything if 1 bad thing gets into any tank.. I have made my own sponge filters using 1inch PVC pipe and a 4inch tile as a base got a box real cheap on the clearance isle.. All I run is a sponge filter in each tank my tank size varies from 10 gallon to 20 talls I have 26 tanks running right now on a alita 40 and I am bleeding off tons of air right now but I just built a new stand to hold 6 29gallon tanks so as soon as I get them running I should be ok on the air.. the thing to remember is water changes water changes I do water changes once a week changing 75 to 90 percent depending on the tank and what I have in it I keep mostly Goodeids and wanting to get more characodons

#3 D9VIN

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Posted 20 August 2011 - 04:12 AM

Yeah, water changes are the most important thing, that is what really turns me on to the central filter. Central filter-central water change. I figured I could change all the water in the central, an vac a little out of each tank to pick up the poo. How do you 'bleed off air'. Is it as simple as a needle valve adjusted to where you like your flow?

And is your name Devon?

#4 Devon1953

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Posted 20 August 2011 - 01:58 PM

I am still an advocate for each tank having it's own filter system.. if your doing water changes and have sponge filters why use a central filter.. too many things can go wrong keep it simple keep it fun .. works every time.

Devon is a tribute to the best trail horse I ever owned.. my real name is Donald

I use small valves screwd into my 1 inch pvc feed line that runs across top of fish room.. right now have 3 of them wide open bleeding air off

#5 D9VIN

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Posted 20 August 2011 - 06:46 PM

So how do you regulate water temperature? With the ambient temp of the room?

#6 Thriftyfisher

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Posted 21 August 2011 - 10:54 AM

The other thing that you can do is have each tank with its own sponge filter and then a central water change system. In this type of system each tank has its own sponge filter so you don’t have to worry about the possibility of spreading diseases. It is also plumbed for a water overflow system (there are a couple of different types some you drill the tank others you don’t).

Jim Graham has a great set up. This link shows his fish house in progress. http://www.motorcity...fish_house.html I will have to venture over and take some pictures of the finished room as I don’t see any online. It is very impressive and he has taken time to think about everything.

Jim has a central air system. Each tank has a wall type sponge filter on it. He also has each tank plumbed with an overflow. The last piece is every tank is plumbed so that he can do a central water change. When new water is added to a tank the overflow allows the water to drain away.

With this type of a set up there is no contamination, you can use sponge filters and water changes are easy.

Most people with fish rooms find that heating the room is easier and cheaper than heating each individual tank.

I hope this helps.


#7 D9VIN

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Posted 22 August 2011 - 01:02 AM

That's brilliant in it's simplicity. I can't believe I didn't think of that. And that fish house looks freaking awesome. I would love to see some finished pics. Now to do some research on auto water change systems...




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