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Any advice/suggestion on setting up a fish room?


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#1 tony0462

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Posted 08 May 2009 - 09:11 AM

Currently I have six individual tanks, filter and heaters going in my home. I would like to move them to my garage and supply them all with one water pump or air pump and some sort of heating system, since heating the garage is out. The tank sizes are one 60 gallon, four 10 gallons and one 30 gallon. I need some ideas on what equipment I might need and how to situate or arrange it so I can possibly use the least amount of equipment. I would appreciate any and all suggestions

#2 copper

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Posted 08 May 2009 - 10:17 AM

How cold does it get in your garage?

#3 tony0462

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Posted 08 May 2009 - 11:31 AM

The temperature sometimes drop down to about 30 degrees

#4 Aquaholicman

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Posted 08 May 2009 - 12:44 PM

You’re going to find it very difficult to keep the tanks heated and to maintain a consistent temperature in them if they are placed in your garage. Any in tank heaters that you use will be constantly running as most of the heat they produce will be lost to the much cooler temperature in the garage. Creating a central aeration system is also out of the question unless you located the pump in a warm room. If you put the air pump in the garage all you would be doing is further cooling down the tanks by pumping cold air into them. If your garage is anything like mine the temperature is constantly fluctuating, and not just by a few degrees. Unless you planned on partially heating and insulating the garage or at least a part of it, putting any fish tanks out there will be a bad idea. If I were you I would pick an area where the tanks will fit and frame up a small room for them. You do not even have to use drywall, simple sheets of insulation will suffice. The room could then be heated with an inexpensive space heater; be sure to continue using in-tank heaters as you never know when the space heater might bite the dust.

#5 copper

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Posted 08 May 2009 - 05:14 PM

Tony,that's way too cold for tropical fish.You have to section off a section of your garage like Aquaholicman said,and install a space heater.The best are the small gass heaters that home dopot sells,but they are very hard to install.You have to run a gass line.This can be dangerous if installed the wrong way.I would recomend hiring a professional to install it.The next best would be a small oil filled electric heater with a thermostat.I have one made by Honeywell.Also choose a location that has electricity and running water,with a drain.All I have to say is WATER CHANGES!!! and a lot of them.You don't want to be carring buckets.Take your time now and plan everything,it will save you time and money later on.

#6 Aquaholicman

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Posted 08 May 2009 - 06:10 PM

I was so focused on the temperateru matter that I did not even consider the difficulty in water changes. Peter is right though, the last thing you want to do is have to carry buckets. I did this for a while and trust me it is no fun. I don't know how you do water changes now but you might want to consider investing in a python hose. This is waht I am using now until I get around to installing an automatic water change system.

#7 shadowhyrst

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Posted 10 May 2009 - 08:45 PM

PVC or hoses can be installed to drain water from tanks if done correctly; and the water reused on plants outside a home. If you're in an apartment, using a hose to fill the tanks is a lot easier than the bucket brigade.

Some peple have bvarrels of aged water that they refill tanks; others have to rely on less conservative methods.

If you do a fish setup, setup tanks for easy empty/refill so you can do it more often. I've used PVC for drainage and refilling, with valves and drip fill. Worth the investment and energy for the double good whammy of ease and frequent water changes.


#8 Devon1953

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Posted 11 May 2009 - 09:59 PM

I once had over 50 tanks set up in a garage I built a room insulated very well had running water and a floor drain at that time I was raising killies and and a few other things... I used mostly rain water on my killies had 3- 50 gallon barrels in the room.. most of the tanks were 10 gallon with a third of them being the 5 gallon type.. I heated it with a baseboard heater... worked out ok till moved and got divorced... note the hobby did not cause the divorce... got rid of the tanks to afford life but it all worked out for the best

#9 GaryE

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Posted 11 May 2009 - 11:14 PM

Tony - Is the garage attached to the house? I have a garage in Canada, slightly cooler than California. I roughed in a styrofoam insulated wall halfway across. The fish are on the inside, and the outside is used for storage. I'm converting to fahrenheit in my head, but the outside gets to the high forties and the inside stays in the mid to low seventies with a baseboard heater. The actual installation of it all wasn't expensive.
We're below 32 f outside from October to April, and january and february are really cold.
I drain tanks to the floor drain, and run a python from a basement bathroom. The running is inconvenient, but I probably get to eat a few extra chocolate bars per year with it.
You can't do it unless you can heat the room.




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